MEDALS & AWARDS

Missions 11 to 20          Missions 21 to 30            Missions 31 to 40        Missions 41 to 50          Missions 51 to 60            Missions 61 to 70        Missions 71 to 80          Missions 81 to 90            Missions 91 to 100

Mission 1: Reggio Emilia, 14 December 1943

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

1

24 (10)

0

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. John Michaels, Bombardier, 316th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11804, Lucky Penny, for valor while participating in aerial flight on 14 December 1943.  Suffering a loss of compartment heat as a result of enemy actions, 2nd Lt. Michaels refused to allow the pilot to drop out of formation, thus exposing himself to extreme frostbite conditions in order to provide the crew the benefits of the mutual defensive fire of the squadron while over enemy territory.  His bravery, courage and self-sacrifice for his fellow airmen are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

Mission 2: Sofia, 16 December 1943

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

1 (1)

2

0

55 (33)

8

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Silver Star (posthumous) awarded to 2nd Lt. Mark Blackbird, Navigator, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11822, Old Crow Express, for gallantry in action while participating in aerial flight on 16 December 1943.  Suffering a serious wound and loss of compartment heat as a result of enemy actions, 2nd Lt. Blackbird refused to allow the pilot to drop out of formation, thus exposing himself to extreme frostbite conditions and certain death in order to provide the crew the benefits of the mutual defensive fire of the squadron while over enemy territory. His bravery, courage and self-sacrifice for his fellow airmen are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

 

Distinguished Flying Cross awarded to 2nd Lt. Thomas Franks, co-pilot, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11821, General Comedian, for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on 16 December 1943.  After the pilot was killed just minutes before the bombs were released, 2nd Lt. Franks took over command of the plane, allowing the bombardier to make a successful bombing run.  After the bomb run, the lost of oxygen forced 2nd Lt. Franks to drop out-of-formation and soon after, the plane's navigator was killed.  Piloting alone, out-of-formation and without a navigator, despite these obstacles, 2nd Lt. Franks still managed to reach friendly territory by dead-reckoning, thus saving the plane and 6 other crew members.  His calmness under fire and his flying ability are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

 

Distinguished Flying Cross awarded to 1st Lt. Frank Kingsley, pilot, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11833, Princess Lilikoi, for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on 16 December 1943.  During the withdrawal battle from the target, enemy fighters heavily damaged Lt. Kingsley's plane, seriously wounding his co-pilot and wounding Lt. Kingsley.  His plane now heavily damaged, Lt. Kingsley despite his own wounds still remained in formation.  Lt. Kinsley piloted his severely damaged bomber over 200 miles alone and later made a successful belly landing due to the failure of one of the main landing gears, saving 7 other crew members, three of them seriously who would have been unable to parachute to safety.  His professionalism and his flying ability are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

Mission 3: Athens, 20 December 1943

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

3

34 (17)

13

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. Erik Swanson, Bombardier, 317th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11812, Frisco Kid, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 20 December 1943.  Lt. Swanson's bomb run resulted in 95% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing  substantial damage to the enemy's aerodromes and hindering the enemy's ability to wage war.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

 

Air Medal awarded to 1st Lt. Mark Yoshikawa, Pilot, 317th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11816, Go for Broke, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 20 December 1943.  Suffering a loss of compartment oxygen as a result of enemy actions, Lt. Yoshikawa was forced to drop out of formation over enemy territory.  In spite of the odds, Lt. Yoshikawa still was able to bring back his severely damaged aircraft to his home base on 3 engines while escaping from numerous enemy fighters, thus saving his plane and 9 other crewmembers.  His bravery and skill are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

 

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. Al Williams, co-pilot, 317th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11815, Good Time Gal, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 20 December 1943.  After falling out of formation after their bomber took a direct flak hit in the waist, Lt. Williams, along with his pilot, helped to regain control and leveled out the fully loaded bomber and still continued with the bomb run.  After the bomb run, both pilots successfully managed to fly their crippled B-17 a distance of over 300 miles back to Foggia alone, all the while fending off numerous enemy aerial attacks over hostile territory, saving 4 other crewmembers.  His bravery, courage and skill are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

Mission 4: Rimini, 26 December 1943

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

0

9 (2)

7

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Mission 5: Pola, 28 December 1943

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

2

2

25 (14)

0

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. Nathaniel R. Duncan, Bombardier, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11833, Princess Lilikoi, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 28 December 1943.  Lt. Duncan's bomb run resulted in 92% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing  substantial damage to the enemy's submarine pens and hindering the enemy's ability to wage war.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

 

Air Medal awarded to Technical Sergeant Andrew McArthy, Radio Operator, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11823, Lucky Laurel, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 28 December 1943.  Prior to his aircraft having to ditch as as result of battle damage, TSgt. McArthy remained at his station until the last possible moment, continued to broadcast the accurate location coordinates for Air-Sea rescue.  TSgt. McArthy's SOS was instrumental towards his crew's rescue within hours of the plane's ditching, helped naval components to rescue himself and 8 other crewmembers adrift.  His calmness and expertise under difficult circumstances are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps

 

Distinguished Flying Cross awarded to 1st Lt. Todd Wilson, pilot, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11823, Lucky Laurel, for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on 28 December 1943.  After the bomb run, the lost of two engines forced 1st Lt. Wilson to drop out-of-formation and damage to a fuel tank would not allow the plane to reach Italy. Alone, out-of-formation and fending off numerous enemy fight attacks, despite these obstacles, 1st Lt. Wilson, along with his co-pilot, 2nd Lt. Brian Johnson, successfully ditched their bomber within range of friendly territory to be picked up by friendly naval forces, thus saving himself and 8 other crew members under his command.  His calmness under fire and his flying ability are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

 

Distinguished Flying Cross awarded to 2nd Lt. Brian Johnson, co-pilot, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11823, Lucky Laurel, for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on 28 December 1943.  After the bomb run, the lost of two engines forced the Lucky Laurel to drop out-of-formation and damage to a fuel tank would not allow the plane to reach Italy.  Alone, out-of-formation and fending off numerous enemy fight attacks, despite these obstacles, 2nd Lt. Johnson along with his pilot, 1st Lt. Todd Wilson, they successfully ditched their crippled bomber within range of friendly territory to be picked up by friendly naval forces, thus saving himself and 8 other crew members.  His calmness under fire and his flying ability are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

Mission 6: Ferrara, 29 December 1943

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

0

25 (7)

0

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Mission 7: Padua, 30 December 1943

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

0

42 (28)

0

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Mission 8: Turin, 4 January 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

0

39 (15)

0

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Mission 9: Piraeus, 8 January 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

1 (1)

0

0

0

1

45 (21)

0

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

 

Congressional Medal of Honor awarded to SSgt. Virgil I. Hoogesteger, Flight Engineer, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11826, The Russian Lady, for Conspicuous Gallantry and Intrepidity at the risk of life, above and beyond the call of duty, in action involving actual conflict with an opposing armed force while participating in aerial flight on 8 January 1944.  While over the target area after the bomb run, the pilot was seriously wounded and the co-pilot was killed.  Staff Sergeant Hoogesteger's quick action in taking over controls prevented the plane from going into an uncontrollable spin.  Staff Sergeant Hoogesteger kept the plane in formation despite the loss of the #1 engine and flew the plane over 350 miles returning to his home base.  Once over the base, Staff Sergeant Hoogesteger held the plane level so that the four unwounded crewmen could bail out.  Although he was not a skilled pilot, Staff Sergeant Hoogesteger bravely attempted to land the plane in order to save the lives of three seriously wounded crewmembers who were too seriously injured to bail out.  Tragically, the plane crashed, killing all aboard.  His unselfish sacrifice for his fellow soldiers, his bravery in extreme circumstances against overwhelming odds of success and his high moral courage are in keeping with the best traditions of the United States Army Air Corps.

 

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. Bernard Stubbs, Bombardier, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11842, The Ant's Hill, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 8 January 1944.  Lt. Stubbs' bomb run resulted in 97% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing  substantial damage to the enemy's dock yards and hindering the enemy's ability to wage war.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

Mission 10: Brod, 10 January 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

1

0

0

0

33 (7)

0

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

 

Distinguished Service Cross awarded to SSgt. Maynard K. Powell, Flight Engineer, 316th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11801, Special Delivery, for Extraordinary Heroism in connection with Military Operations Against an Opposing Armed Force while participating in aerial flight on 10 January 1944.  While leaving the target area after the bomb run, the both pilots were killed by enemy fighter attacks.  Staff Sergeant Powell quick action in taking over controls prevented the plane from going into an uncontrollable spin.  Staff Sergeant Powell kept the plane in formation and flew the plane over 350 miles returning to his home base.  Once over the base, Staff Sergeant Powell held the plane steady so that five able crewmen could bail out.  Although he was not a skilled pilot, Staff Sergeant Powell, in total disregard for his own safety, bravely attempted to land the plane in order to save the life of the seriously wounded navigator who was too seriously injured to bail out.  Tragically, the plane crashed, killing the navigator and seriously injuring Staff Sergeant Powell.  His courage under extreme circumstances against overwhelming odds of success and his high dedication to duty are in keeping with the best traditions of the United States Army Air Corps.

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