MEDALS & AWARDS

Missions 1 to 10            Missions 11 to 20            Missions 21 to 30        Missions 31 to 40          Missions 51 to 60            Missions 61 to 70        Missions 71 to 80

Mission 41: Verona, Italy, 22 March 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

1

20 (7)

3

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Air Medal awarded to Captain Phillip J. Morris, Bombardier, 316th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11806, Satin Doll, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 22 March 1944.  Captain Morris' bomb run resulted in 92% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing substantial damage to the enemy's marshalling yards which prevented the transport of supplies to the front lines and hindering his ability to wage war.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

Mission 42: Reggio Emilia, Italy, 28 March 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

0

11 (4)

9

Mission 43: Linz, Austria, 29 March 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

2

0

1

20 (2)

10

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Silver Star awarded to 1st Lt. Mark Choate, Pilot, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11878, Carolina Lady, for gallantry in action against an opposing armed force on 29 March 1944.  During the mission after suffering a loss of compartment heat as a result of enemy actions, 1st Lt. Choate decided to remain in formation, thus exposing himself to extreme frostbite condition of -50 degrees, in order to provide his crew the benefits of the mutual defensive fire of the squadron, while over enemy territory.  His dedication to duty and bravery are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

 

Silver Star awarded to 2nd Lt. Patrick Fletcher, Co-pilot, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11878, Carolina Lady, for gallantry in action against an opposing armed force on 29 March 1944.  During the mission after suffering a loss of compartment heat as a result of enemy actions, 2nd Lt. Fletcher, along with his aircraft commander, decided to remain in formation, thus exposing themselves to extreme frostbite condition of -50 degrees, in order to provide the crew the benefits of the mutual defensive fire of the squadron, while over enemy territory.  His dedication to duty and bravery are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

 

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. Lester Paxson, Bombardier, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-14196, Goodbye Girl II, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 29 March 1944.  Lt. Paxson's bomb run resulted in 95% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing substantial damage to the enemy's aircraft production facilities which prevented the manufacture of enemy aircraft and hindering his ability to wage war.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

Mission 44: Sofia, Bulgaria, 31 March 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

0

38 (25)

12

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Mission 45: Steyr, Austria, 2 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

2

3

49 (24)

10

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Distinguished Flying Cross awarded to Captain Jamie Jameson, Pilot, 316th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11777, Lucky Seven, for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on 2 April 1944. Captain Jameson managed to maintain the coherency and discipline of his crew and the control of the aircraft after the aircraft had suffered a direct flak hit to the nose compartment.  Soon after being forced to descend to a lower altitude due to the damage, Captain Jameson, along with Lt. Ratt, managed to bring his heavily damaged aircraft home in spite of numerous and heavy enemy fighter attacks which caused additional damage to the aircraft.  Despite a minor head wound, Captain Jameson still managed to keep his crew motivated and focused on the difficult flight home covering over 300 miles back into friendly territory. Over the base, he and Lt. Ratt made a successful landing.  It is only because of his perseverance and bravery that the 7 remaining crew returned to base.  His calmness under fire, his dedication to duty and his flying ability are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

 

Distinguished Flying Cross awarded to 1st Lt. Richard Ratt, Co-pilot, 316th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11777, Lucky Seven, for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on 2 April1944.  Prior to the bomb run the aircraft took a direct flak hit to the nose compartment which forced the aircraft to abort the mission.  1st Lt. Ratt aided the captain of the aircraft, Captain Jameson, in keeping the damaged aircraft flying despite its badly damaged status deep inside enemy territory.  Now out-of-formation, 1st Lt. Ratt along with his pilot, Captain Jameson, who was wounded, he helped to successfully return their crippled bomber a distance of over 300 miles to friendly territory and to assist the pilot in making a successful landing, all the while fending off numerous enemy fighter attacks over hostile territory.  His actions contributed in returning the 7 other crew men to their home base.  His calmness under fire, his dedication to duty and his flying ability are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

 

Air Medal awarded to Captain David Collins, Bombardier, 316th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-14205, Lucky Nickel, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 2 April 1944.  Captain Collins' bomb run resulted in 95% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing substantial damage to the enemy's industrial production facilities which prevented the manufacture of ball bearings and hindering his ability to wage war.  In addition, his gunnery accuracy with the chin turret claimed two Me-109 fighters.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

 

Air Medal awarded to Staff Sergeant Charles Jaeger, Flight Engineer, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11877, Easy Does It, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 2 April 1944.  Despite an arm wound, Staff Sergeant Jaeger's managed to shoot down one enemy fighter, damaged another fighter, and assisted the co-pilot to land the plane after pilot was seriously wounded, and with a bomb bay full of bombs and the port landing gear out.  His skill, expertise and devotion to duty are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

Mission 46: Budapest, Hungary, 3 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

1

27 (10)

27

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Air Medal awarded to Sergeant Curtis Hatten, Gunner, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-12232, Rosie Gal, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 3 April 1944.  During the mission to Budapest, Sgt. Hatten, without regard for his own personal safety, rendered first aid to his fellow crewmate Sgt. Albert Morris and assumed his defensive position in order to safeguard the lives of the rest of the crew.  While under enemy fire, Sgt. Hatten continued to render life-saving first aid to Sgt. Morris, and also destroyed an enemy fighter from his newly assigned position in the tail gun position, safeguarding the lives of the entire crew.  His skill, expertise and devotion to duty are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

Mission 47: Bucharest, Rumania, 4 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

1

2

27 (13)

54

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Distinguished Flying Cross awarded to 2nd Lt. Joseph Sedgwick, pilot, 317th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-14168, Silver Spoon, for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on 4 April 1944.  After the bomb run, the lost oxygen forced 2nd Lt. Sedgwick to drop out-of-formation and damage to a fuel tank would not allow the plane to reach Italy. Alone, out-of-formation and fending off numerous enemy fight attacks, despite these obstacles, 2nd Lt. Sedgwick, along with his flight engineer, successfully ditched his bomber within range of friendly territory to be picked up by friendly naval forces, thus saving himself and 8 other crew members under his command.  His calmness under fire and his flying ability are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

 

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. Shane Hollabaugh, Bombardier, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-14236, Civic Duty II, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 4 April 1944.  Lt. Hollabaugh's bomb run resulted in 95% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing substantial damage to the enemy's marshalling yards which prevented the transport of supplies and war materials to the front lines and hindering his ability to wage war.  In addition, his gunnery accuracy with the chin turret claimed two Me-109 fighters and damaged a third fighter.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

 

Air Medal awarded to Technical Sergeant, 3rd grade, Michael Ferrelli, Radio Operator, 317th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-14168, Silver Spoon, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 4 April 1943.  Prior to his aircraft having to ditch as as result of battle damage, TSgt. Ferrelli remained at his station until the last possible moment, continued to broadcast the accurate location coordinates for Air-Sea rescue.  TSgt. Ferrelli's SOS was instrumental towards his crew's rescue within hours of the plane's ditching, helped naval components to rescue himself and 8 other crewmembers adrift.  His calmness and expertise under difficult circumstances are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

Mission 48: Nis, Yugoslavia, 5 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

1

1

16 (2)

8

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Distinguished Flying Cross awarded to 2nd Lt. Christopher Laymon, Co-pilot, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 43-8888, 8-Ball, for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on 5 April1944.  2nd Lt. Laymon, who in spite of a serious wound to his lower torso and the pilot dead, kept the plane in formation and flew to the target.  After the bomb run, 2nd Lt. Laymon  now assisted by flight engineer, successfully piloted their crippled bomber a distance of over 250 miles to friendly territory and made a successful landing.  His actions contributed in returning the 8 other crew men to their home base, one man seriously wounded.  His flying ability and devotion to duty are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

 

Air Medal awarded to Staff Sergeant Jeffery Hoag, Flight Engineer, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 43-8888, 8-Ball, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 5 April 1944.  Staff Sergeant Hoag's assisted the co-pilot in keeping the plane in formation and to land the plane after pilot was killed, saving 8 crewmen, one man seriously wounded.  His skill, expertise and devotion to duty are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

Mission 49: Treviso, Italy, 7 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

1

12 (4)

7

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. Daniel Phelps, Bombardier, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 43-7315, Lucy Quipment, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 7 April 1944.  Lt. Phelps' bomb run resulted in 94% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing substantial damage to the enemy's marshalling yards which prevented the transport of supplies and war materials to the front lines and hindering his ability to wage war.  In addition, his gunnery accuracy with the chin turret claimed 1 Fw-190 fighter.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

Mission 50: Vienna, Austria, 12 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

2 (1)

3

54 (38)

14

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Distinguished Flying Cross awarded to 1st Lt. Peter Windley, Pilot, 316th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 43-7229, Rough Times, for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on 12 April 1944. Lt. Windley managed to maintain the coherency and discipline of his crew and the control of the aircraft after the aircraft had suffered a direct flak hit to the waist compartment.  Soon after being forced to descend to a lower altitude due to the damage, Lt. Windley, along with Lt. Huffacker, managed to bring his heavily damaged aircraft home in spite of numerous and heavy enemy fighter attacks which caused additional damage to the aircraft.  Despite the grave situation, Lt. Windley still managed to keep his crew motivated and focused on the difficult flight home covering over 300 miles back into friendly territory. Arriving at the their base, he and Lt. Huffacker attempted a landing with 2 seriously wounded crewmembers aboard.  Unfortunately, the aircraft crash-landed.  It is only because of his perseverance and bravery that the 3 remaining crew were able to return to base alive.  His calmness under fire, his dedication to duty and his flying ability are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

 

Distinguished Flying Cross (posthumous) awarded to 2nd Lt. Dean Huffacker, Co-pilot, 316th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 43-7229, Rough Times, for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on 12 April1944.  Prior to the bomb run the aircraft took a direct flak hit to the waist compartment which forced the aircraft to abort the mission.  Lt. Huffacker aided the captain of the aircraft, 1st Lt. Windley, in keeping the damaged aircraft flying despite its badly damaged status deep inside enemy territory.  Now out-of-formation, 1st Lt. Ratt along with his pilot, Lt. Windley, he helped to successfully return their crippled bomber a distance of over 300 miles to friendly territory and to assist the pilot in making a landing, all the while fending off numerous enemy fighter attacks over hostile territory.  Unfortunately, the aircraft crash-landed and Lt. Huffacker was killed in the crash.  His actions contributed in safely returning the 3 other crew men to their home base.  His calmness under fire, his dedication to duty and his flying ability are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

 

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. Charles Gibbins, Co-pilot, 317th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-12341, Delta Blues, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 12 April 1944.  During the mission, Lt. Gibbins rendered first aid to two wounded crewmen.  One crew man was in serious condition and bleeding profusely and Lt. Gibbins' skill halted the bleeding and contributed to the survival of the crewman.  During the return journey back to their base, the pilot fell unconscious and Lt. Gibbins took control of the aircraft.  With the assistance of the Flight Engineer, Lt. Gibbins successfully landed the damaged bomber. His devotion to duty, his skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

 

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. Frank Geist, Bombardier, 316th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 43-7229, Rough Times, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 12 April 1944.  During the bomb run over Vienna, Austria, his aircraft took a direct hit to the waist compartment.  Lt. Geist was knocked off his seat by flak hit and but he quickly regained his composure to jettison the bomb load to help the pilots regain control of the crippled aircraft.  During the next 4 hours while the aircraft flew returned over 300 miles to friendly territory, his gunnery skill with the chin turret helped to fend off enemy attacks which greatly helped the aircrew return to base while claiming 1 Me-109 fighter and 1 Me-110 fighter-destroyer.  His devotion to duty, his skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

 

Air Medal awarded to 1st Lt. Adam Stein, Bombardier, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-14236, Carolina Lady II, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 12 April 1944.  Lt. Stein was the bombardier of the group's lead ship.  During the bomb run over Vienna, Austria, Lt. Stein was knocked off his seat by a close flak burst.  He quickly regained his seat and managed to put an estimated 50% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing substantial damage to the enemy's aircraft production facilities which prevented the manufacture of enemy aircraft and hindering his ability to wage war.  In addition, his gunnery accuracy with the chin turret claimed 1 Fw-190 fighter.  His devotion to duty, his skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

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