MEDALS & AWARDS

Missions 1 to 10            Missions 11 to 20            Missions 21 to 30        Missions 31 to 40          Missions 41 to 50            Missions 61 to 70        Missions 71 to 80

Mission 51: Gyor, Hungary, 13 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

5

27 (13)

7

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Air Medal awarded to Captain Phillip J. Morris, Bombardier, 316th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11806, Satin Doll, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 13 April 1944 during a mission to Gyor, Hungary.  Captain Morris' bomb run resulted in 99% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing substantial damage to the enemy's aircraft production facilities which prevented the manufacture of enemy aircraft and hindering his ability to wage war.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

 

Air Medal awarded to 1st Lt. Wallace Edwards, Bombardier, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 43-7315, Lucy Quipment, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 13 April 1944 during a mission to Gyor, Hungary. 1st Lt. Edwards displayed extreme skill and courage on the bombardment mission to Gyor, Hungary. His cool head and expertise in manning his defensive guns resulted in the destruction for two (2) FW-190s and additional damage to an ME-110. In addition to his actions in defensive of his ship and fellow crewmembers, he placed over 60% of the bombs on target resulting in sever damage the enemy’s aircraft production facilities. Lieutenant Edwards skill and dedication to duty reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army Air Corps and in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

 

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. Donald Forman, Bombardier, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-14189, Zebra's Revenge, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 13 April 1944.  2nd Lt. Forman bomb run resulted in 97% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing substantial damage to the enemy's aircraft production facilities which prevented the manufacture of enemy aircraft and hindering his ability to wage war.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

 

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. Lawrence Wolfe, Bombardier, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 43-7212, Mawimazo, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 13 April 1944 during the mission to attack aircraft factories at Gyor, Hungary. 2nd Lt. Wolfe's bomb run resulted in 75% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing substantial damage to the enemy's aircraft factories which hindered the ability of the enemy to produce supplies and war materials for the front lines and hindering his ability to wage war. In addition, 2nd Lt. Wolfe's gunnery accuracy with the chin turret claimed two ME-109 fighters and damaged a third fighter which was subsequently shot down by one of his fellow crew-mates.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

Air Medal awarded to Sergeant James Kuderrin, Gunner, 316th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-12237, Northern Dream, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 13 April 1944 during a mission to Gyor, Hungary.  Sergeant Kuderrin, even though he was wounded twice during the course of the mission he still manned his gun position and under heavy hostile action was able to cripple an FW-190 during a critical juncture in our mission.  If he had failed it is quite possible that our plane would have been shot down and all the crew lost.  His tenacity in continuing to do his duty under considerable pain reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army Air Corps and is in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

Mission 52: Ploesti, Romania, 15 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

3 (1)

0

1

1

58 (37)

18

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

 

Distinguished Service Cross awarded to 1st Lt. Jeffery Orwing, Navigator, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-14236, Carolina Lady II, for Extraordinary Heroism in connection with Military Operations Against an Opposing Armed Force while participating in aerial flight on 15 April 1944.  While approaching the target area, the both pilots were seriously wounded by enemy fighter attacks.  Moving quickly up from the nose compartment, Lt. Orwing joined up with Sergeant Joe Black in taking over the controls.  Lt. Orwing, along with Sgt. Black, kept the plane in formation and flew the plane over 300 miles, until Lt. Adam Stein replaced Sgt. Black upon reaching the Adriatic Sea.   On arriving over their home base, Lts. Orwing and Stein held the plane steady so that four able crewmen could bail out to safety. Although they were not skilled pilots, Lts. Orwing and Stein, in total disregard for their own safety, bravely attempted to land the plane in order to save the lives of the seriously wounded pilots who were too injured to bail out.  Tragically, the plane crashed, killing the pilots and TSgt. T.E. Lipton, while seriously injuring Lt. Stein, while Lt. Orwing escaped with light injuries.  Lt. Orwing's courage under extreme circumstances against overwhelming odds of success and his high dedication to duty are in keeping with the best traditions of the United States Army Air Corps.

 

 

Distinguished Service Cross awarded to 1st Lt. Adam Stein, Bombardier, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-14236, Carolina Lady II, for Extraordinary Heroism in connection with Military Operations Against an Opposing Armed Force while participating in aerial flight on 15 April 1944.  While approaching the target area, the both pilots were seriously wounded by enemy fighter attacks.  Once over the Adriatic Sea, Lt. Stein, along with Lt. Orwing, flew the plane back to their home base.  Both men kept the plane steady so four able crewmen could bail out to safety. Although they were not skilled pilots, Lts. Stein and Orwing, in total disregard for their own safety, bravely attempted to land the plane in order to save the lives of the seriously wounded pilots who were too injured to bail out.  Tragically, the plane crashed, killing the pilots and TSgt. T.E. Liption, while seriously injuring Lt. Stein and lightly injuring Lt. Orwing.  Lt. Stein's courage under extreme circumstances against overwhelming odds of success and his high dedication to duty are in keeping with the best traditions of the United States Army Air Corps.

 

 

Distinguished Service Cross (posthumous) awarded to Technical Sergeant, 4th grade, Thomas E. Lipton, Radio Operator, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-14236, Carolina Lady II, for Extraordinary Heroism in connection with Military Operations Against an Opposing Armed Force while participating in aerial flight on 15 April 1944.  During the flight the group was under continuous and severe fighter attack.  TSgt. Lipton's aircraft was hit repeatedly by head-on attacks that killed the flight engineer and left both pilots severely wounded.  TSgt. Lipton helped render first aid to the pilots and took over the top turret guns. During the running air battle TSgt. Lipton shot down 2 ME-109 aircraft.  As the aircraft neared home base, TSgt. Lipton established and maintained radio contact with base, giving landing instructions to the bombardier and navigator as they attempted to fly and land the plane. Ignoring an order to abandon the aircraft, TSgt. Lipton supervised the safe evacuation of the plane by the remaining unwounded crewmen. He then continued to remain in radio contact with base and render first aid to the wounded pilots.  TSgt. Lipton was killed when the B-17 crashed on landing. He courage under extreme circumstances against overwhelming odds of success and his high dedication to duty are in keeping with the best traditions of the United States Army Air Corps.

 

Distinguished Flying Cross awarded to Sergeant Joseph Black, Gunner, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-14236, Carolina Lady II, for for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on 15 April 1944.  During the flight the group was under continuous and severe fighter attack that left both pilots on his plane severely wounded and the killed the flight engineer just before the bomb run.  Sgt. Black left his guns and came forward in the aircraft, pulling the pilot out of his seat and taking control of the aircraft until the navigator came up to assist him. Sgt. Black, along with Lt. Jeffery Orwing, managed to keep the B-17 in level flight and in formation while other crewman performed first aid on the stricken pilots. Sgt. Black then assisted the navigator in flying the aircraft until it reached the Adriatic Sea where Lt. Adam Stein replaced him. Once over the base he then assisted other crewman in moving the pilots to the radio room, and insuring that other crewman were able to jump from the aircraft safely before he jumped himself.  His actions reflect great credit upon himself, the 88th Bomb Group, and the United States Army Air Corps.

 

Air Medal awarded to Captain Phillip J. Morris, Bombardier, 316th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-11806, Satin Doll, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 15 April 1944.  Captain Morris' bomb run resulted in 92% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing substantial damage to the enemy's marshalling yards which prevented the transport of supplies to the front lines and hindering his ability to wage war.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

Mission 53: Belgrade, Yugoslavia, 16 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

1

14 (5)

10

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. James T. Hearn, Bombardier, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 43-7261, Thundermug, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 16 April 1944.  2nd Lt. Hearn's bomb run resulted in 97% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing substantial damage to the enemy's ammunitions plant which prevented ammunitions from reaching the front lines and hindering his ability to wage war.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

Mission 54: Belgrade, Yugoslavia, 17 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

1

29 (7)

5

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. James T. Hearn, Bombardier, 399th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 43-7261, Thundermug, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 17 April 1944.  2nd Lt. Hearn's bomb run resulted in 95% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing substantial damage to the enemy's marshalling yards which prevented the transport of supplies to the front lines and hindering his ability to wage war.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps.

Mission 55: Wiener-Neustadt, Austria, 23 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

0

31 (7)

0

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Mission 56: Ploesti, Romania, 24 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

0

44 (14)

7

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Mission 57: Piombino, Italy, 28 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Mission 58: Toulon, France, 29 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Mission 59: Milan, Italy, 30 April 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

0

0

0

1

31 (13)

13

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. Eugene Delsey, Bombardier, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 43-8901, Midnight Express, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 30 April 1944.  2nd Lt. Delsey's bomb run resulted in 95% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing substantial damage to the enemy's marshalling yards which prevented the transport of supplies to the front lines and hindering his ability to wage war.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

Mission 60: Ploesti, Romania, 5 May 1944

Medal of Honor

Distinguished Service Cross

Silver Star

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Purple Heart

POW

0

2

0

0

1

56 (24)

6

Numbers in parentheses are posthumous awards.

Air Medal awarded to 2nd Lt. Lars Olsen, Bombardier, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-12013, Lucky 13, for Meritorious Achievement while participating in aerial flight on 5 May 1944.  2nd Lt. Olsen's bomb run resulted in 95% of his bombs hitting within 1000 feet of the Impact Point, causing substantial damage to the enemy's marshalling yards which prevented the transport of supplies to the front lines and hindering his ability to wage war.  Lt. Olsen also shot down an enemy fighter.  His skill and expertise are in keeping with the best traditions of the Army Air Corps."

 

 

Distinguished Service Cross awarded to Staff Sergeant Oliver Holmes, Flight Engineer, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-12013, Lucky 13, for Extraordinary Heroism in connection with Military Operations Against an Opposing Armed Force while participating in aerial flight on 5 May 1944.  While returning to base over Yugoslavia, the pilot was seriously wounded and the co-pilot was killed by enemy fighter attacks.  Moving quickly from top turret, SSgt. Holmes joined up with 2nd Lt. Neil Finch in taking over the controls.  SSgt. Holmes, along with Lt. Finch, kept the plane in formation and flew the plane over 200 miles to their home base.  Although they were not skilled pilots, SSgt. Holmes and Lt. Finch, in total disregard for their own safety, bravely attempted to land the plane in order to save the lives of the two seriously wounded crewmen who were too injured to bail out.  Tragically, the plane crashed, killing the pilots and two gunners. SSgt. Holmes, Lt. Finch and one other crewman escaped with minor injuries, while 3 others suffered serious injuries.  SSgt. Holmes' courage under extreme circumstances against overwhelming odds of success and his high dedication to duty are in keeping with the best traditions of the United States Army Air Corps.

 

 

Distinguished Service Cross awarded to 2nd Lt. Neil Finch, Navigator, 318th Bomb Squadron, 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy), aircraft 42-12013, Lucky 13, for Extraordinary Heroism in connection with Military Operations Against an Opposing Armed Force while participating in aerial flight on 5 May 1944.  While returning to base over Yugoslavia, the pilot was seriously wounded and the co-pilot was killed by enemy fighter attacks.  Moving quickly from nose compartment, 2nd Lt. Finch joined up with SSgt. Oliver Holmes in taking over the controls.  Lt. Finch, along with SSgt. Holmes, kept the plane in formation and flew the plane over 200 miles to their home base.  Although they were not skilled pilots, Lt. Finch and SSgt. Holmes, in total disregard for their own safety, bravely attempted to land the plane in order to save the lives of the two seriously wounded crewmen who were too injured to bail out.  Tragically, the plane crashed, killing the pilots and two gunners. Lt. Finch, SSgt. Holmes, and one other crewman escaped with minor injuries, while 3 others suffered serious injuries.  Lt. Finch's courage under extreme circumstances against overwhelming odds of success and his high dedication to duty are in keeping with the best traditions of the United States Army Air Corps.

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